Our kids need to be reminded of risk

11/Oct/2011

Comments: 2 readers have left a comment

THE arrest of a teenage boy in Bali for possession of marijuana should serve as a warning to families planning an overseas holiday to talk to their children about the enormous risk that comes with illegal drug possession.

For one 14-year-old boy and his New South Wales parents, the warning has come too late as he faces uncertainty in a cell at Denpasar’s police headquarters in a country with a hard-line reputation for dealing with drug offenders.

As anyone who travels to Bali knows, Australians are flocking to the island paradise in droves, and now represent the number-one source of all foreign arrivals.

In July this year, 437,000 Australians had travelled to Bali over the past year, a 27 per cent jump year-on-year.

It’s no secret as to what is luring holiday-makers to the island – a relaxed, laid-back experience where Australians can indulge in their passion for food, drink and fine hotels without breaking the bank.

Like this latest family caught up in a Bali drug arrest, many Australians are repeat visitors; making more than one visit per year by taking advantage of airfares significantly cheaper than those to Australian destinations.

Folk arriving at Bali’s Ngurah Rai airport are ominously greeted by huge signs stating: “Welcome to Indonesia, Death penalty for drug traffickers”.

For those who ignore the risk, the string of Australians serving seriously long jail terms in the tough Kerobokan Prison for drug possession and trafficking should help underscore that money and political intervention will not save Australians acting up abroad.

What Australians need to do is wake up and understand the responsibility that comes with entering a country with a different set of laws to our own.

This means talking though the risks with our families, and understanding that the threat of the Indonesian death penalty is very real.


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What everyone else is thinking

neen

11/10/2011

Nobody wants a teenager or anybody locked away in an Indonesian jail,however when are we going to wake up the the fact we are visitors and our lifstyle and beliefs are not theirs.

Stop going overseas thinking your kids can roam the streets of an overseas country where poverty and corruption do exist which leads to setups while you laze around the pool drinking cocktails.
If the 14yr old was considered mature enough to be out where this could happen without adult supervision then he is streetwise to the laws and if he is naive then his parents are cupable for neglecting their duty.

Release the boy and lock up the parents for a month.

Then perhaps this stupid & easily avoided "sting" won't happen again and if it does then que sera sera...
As an Australian who is tired of foreigners breaking our laws or not respecting our culture I am ashamed we Yet Again disrespected anothers laws.

Theresa

11/10/2011

Like Judge Judy says - by the time you get caught - you would have done it ten times... Australia can learn from Indonesia - and that way we may have less criminals behind bars by the time they are old enough to serve jail time. I think a two year jail sentence will suffice and set an example to the rest of the kids that think they are adults.

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